Nourishing the Spirit

How can I let go of the stress of driving from soccer tryouts to the grocery store and, instead, be still and notice the innocent words of a five year old about the secret world inside an acorn?
— Carrie-Anne Moss
Carrie-Anne Moss. Photo by Denise Andrade-Kroon

Carrie-Anne Moss. Photo by Denise Andrade-Kroon

{ this is a repost of an article from our archives. may it nourish you now as it did before. }

We are all on the go right now.

I am working and the kids are busy with school. The holidays are just around the corner. Maybe you can relate? Perhaps between your work, taking people to and from practices, caring for the home, and just life, you’re in the process of trying to re-tune your rhythms and find some balance. Maybe you simply need to sit down and breathe. Our lives are so full, yet part of us can feel so empty.

I love this privilege of caring for and feeding my family. I also know there are times when I feel like I cannot do any more. It’s not so much that my body is weary, but that my spirit is hungry as I keep trying to give and give and give from a well that is bone-dry. I know that, in order to continue with strength and grace, I must replenish my spirit.

Spirit

What is spirit? For me, it is the fire inside, the feeling in my gut that gently guides my decisions. It is my energy, my presence. It is my connection to my inner divinity—my fierce, feminine soul. But when there is so much noise around me, especially during this time of year, I cannot always hear what my spirit needs to feel full again. I must nourish it. I must do what keeps me grounded and clear, inspired and connected.

This means meditation to guide me back to my intuition. It means asking myself deep, probing questions—how can I nourish this moment? How can I turn this around? How can I let go of the stress of driving from soccer tryouts to the grocery store and, instead, be still and notice the innocent words of a five year old about the secret world inside an acorn? How can I not take it personally when one of my children says something that could make me fly off the handle? How can I pause to see that my stress is leaking all over them? How can I remember that I’m the grown up so I must stop, take that deep breath, and be an example?

I’m not talking about being perfect. Being authentic is an important gift we give our children and they know when we aren’t being real.

I’m not talking about being perfect. Being authentic is an important gift we give our children and they know when we aren’t being real. I want to regroup—to shift in this moment and not be lying in bed at night wishing I could do it over.

And when I can’t catch it quickly, this turning around and seeing what’s important, as I lie in bed looking over my day wishing it could be different, I won’t beat myself up. I will trust that I am mastering something and that this takes time. And I will humbly bow to the divine teacher within me and keep moving forward, no time for regret.

Intention

Nourishing my spirit takes discipline. It takes noticing. It takes being present and aware. This week I’ve set my intention to stop and notice how I can be present to each moment. I will remind myself and I will ask a friend to remind me. I will catch myself in the whirl of my mind and drop into my heart. Kundalini yoga and meditation give me that. When I do it it works; when I don’t it doesn’t.

These simple and devotional acts of self-care will not only nurture me, but allow me to give more of myself to the people I love. What intention will you set this week? How will you nourish your spirit through awareness? If you find yourself in a moment of deep self-nurturing, please consider sharing on Instagram using the hashtag #annapurnaliving to connect with others who might need a kind word, a quiet moment of rest, a fresh start, and the gentle witness of others who understand. 

With love,
Carrie-Anne