A Woman’s Grace and ... Baseball?

But truth be retold, nothing is more powerful than a ‘Woman’s Grace.’ Not Google, not Apple, not the US Government. And EVERY woman has this capacity within her. Understanding that she can use the pressures that surround her to raise her energy instead of leaving her exhausted is paramount.
— Steven Roy
Carrie Anne Moss. Photo by Steven Roy.

Carrie Anne Moss. Photo by Steven Roy.

by Steven Roy

Not considered high on the list for a woman’s wardrobe, for it doesn’t accentuate or reveal the body; doesn’t add a ton of color and panache. If anything, it covers that “HAIR” which can be so highly coveted, quite often for a lifetime. So what is it that is so uniquely attractive about a woman wearing a baseball hat? Maybe it’s the bill of the hat that narrows the facial features to focus on her eyes, magnifying the lenses to her soul. Or perhaps it’s the air of masculine bravado attached to the sport that a woman so effortlessly embraces when she puts on a baseball hat, emulating the spirit of a game that is considered ‘America’s Favorite Pastime.’ A sport that requires it to be played with the utmost grace to become triumphant: Few things can be more beautiful, powerful, uplifting, inspiring, and poetic than the game of baseball. Except, being in the presence of a ‘Woman’s Grace.’

In today’s world, a woman is asked to vacillate between the duties of her higher selfless being, meeting the demands of her family, and then hold the commitment to her work in an employment world originally constructed by men. Yes, donning multiple hats through womanhood is a typical experience among today’s women, the least of all baseball hats. But what is it about a ‘Woman’s Grace’ that has caused poets throughout the centuries to write about them? Generals to wage war for them? Men to lose all self-confidence and become a shell of themselves in their presence? Or made to feel like the ‘King of the World?’

They are creative, emotional, compassionate, fierce beings with the God given gift to birth another human being into our world. Whether or not she bears children, that essence lies deep within her, from the moment she enters this world until the time she departs from it. Like the game of baseball, a woman who exudes ‘Grace’ is fulfilling not only her highest self, but also enlivening everyone and everything around her with vitality, calmness, joy and love. Her skin and eyes glow, revealing her true timeless beauty. But also like baseball, a woman’s ‘Grace’ is achieved through dedication and an unwavering commitment to the game, of ‘Life.’ 

Women can experience a lot of what is called ‘Downward Pressure’ in today’s world. Meaning, they are being constantly pushed by the unremitting forces of media and culture, work and family that drive them further and further away from their authentic higher selves. But truth be retold, nothing is more powerful than a ‘Woman’s Grace.’ Not Google, not Apple, not the US Government. And EVERY woman has this capacity within her. 

Understanding that she can use the pressures that surround her to raise her energy instead of leaving her exhausted is paramount. Like a pitcher, who grips a baseball with just the right amount of pressure to get it to come over the plate exactly the way he wants it to, she has to work within to find that easeful expression of herself. Stress, pressure, tension are bundled up forms of energy that need to be directed to flow and create rather than deplete. 

The difference between a ‘Woman’s Grace’ and baseball? When a baseball game ends, we carry that ‘Graceful Euphoria’ with us for some time, embedding it into our memories. When we leave the presence of a ‘Graceful Woman,’ we know they make us and the world a better place, not just for today and the future, but far beyond what we can only begin to imagine.  

Photo by Tara Whitney

Photo by Tara Whitney

About Steven

Steven Roy is an actor, writer and Yogi, husband to Carrie-Anne Moss and father of three.